What Parents Can Do to Improve Their Children’s Reading Skills

teaching your child to read“There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them,” once said Joseph Brodsky. Today, it seems that a lot of us are committing this grave crime. Indeed, only a few remain passionate about reading new books and learning new knowledge.

Children are no exception to this. Many reports indicate that today’s youngsters have little to no passion for the written word. As a result, many fail to be skillful in reading at an early age.

But here’s the deal: if a child has unimpressive reading skills, it is because they haven’t been exposed to an adequate amount of literature yet. Ergo, the best solution to improve their skill is to make them love reading. To do that, experts have laid out a few suggestions for parents:

Tutoring Sessions

One-on-one tutoring is quite effective for academic performance, but it is also possible to take this as an opportunity to make the child read more. As the dynamic is only between two people, the child would have more attention from the tutor.

Library Trips

A trip to the library could break the habit of non-reading in the family. There’s just nothing as charming as lines of bookshelves full of interesting titles. Parents should also consider the school’s library. Such places have a lot of language and reading classroom resources, says RICGroup.com.au. What’s good about reading at the school library is that the books are definitely age-appropriate for the child.

Book Club Activities

Local book clubs provide opportunities to help children read. Activities like this go a long way to boost the child’s interest in reading for a couple of reasons. First, they get to read with children their age; and second, because they read titles that they find interesting.

Bonding Moments

An analysis piece from Forbes provides a unique perspective on why children don’t read – and it’s because parents don’t do so. With that said, some parent-child activities that involve reading would go a long way to help the child have some interest in the written word. Over time, they would pick up the habit of reading and start a new book on their own.

Parents have a lot of techniques they can use to break the trend of apathy toward the printed word. With these methods, there is no reason for a child to have no interest in reading.

Posted on by Monique Gates in Dot Edu

About Monique Gates

Monique is a former dean of Language at a local university in California. She writes reviews on educational institutions and works with government agencies in improving language programs for foreign students.

Comments are closed.